Category Archives: Looking

A continuous feeling of intense longing

Tayler-Glitch

As I was documenting a work that is presently on display as part of La Nouvelle Biennale, this image emerged from a fortuitous glitch in timing and technique.

La Nouvelle Biennale • From April 23rd to June 4th 2016 • Opening on April 23rd at 3pm
Galerie Thomas Henry Ross Art Contemporain and Galerie Margot Eleanor Ross art actuel

Advertisements

Playful Conceptualism

119 m Above Sea Level /  119 m au-dessus du niveau de la mer
6 décembre 2014 – 14 février 2015
Galerie d’art contemporain SBC Gallery of Contemporary Art

CRUM,

CRUM, “119 m Above Sea Level” (installation view), 2014. Courtesy Galerie SBC. Photo: Guy L’Heureux.

A collaborative project with the Centre de recherche urbaine de Montréal (CRUM) imaginatively restaging the lost archives of 45°30′ N-73°36’ W, an exhibition first presented at the Saidye Bronfman Center for the Arts and the Sir George Williams University Art Galleries (1971).

A review of the exhibition for Canadian Art describes the exhibition as, “peculiar, yet compelling.”
– Emily Falvey, “CRUM’s Playful Conceptualism” Canadian Art, 12 January 2015.

Vous avez posé plusieurs problèmes à la fois…

et je voudrais les étaler un peu…

ComicCorrected

A “graphic guide” or comic book-style explanation of Marxist aesthetics created for Romeo Gongora’s project Just Watch Me. To the right, a maquette of Synthèse des Arts, 1967 by Fusion des Arts.

ComicReader

Reading the comic

The dialogue in the comic is quoted from Alain Badiou’s visit to Montreal in 1968. He gave this workshop on Marxist aesthetics at the same time that he attended the trial of “alleged separatist-terrorist leader,” Charles Gagnon, as one of two observers from the International Federation of Human Rights Leagues.

Network Consciousness: Art Metropole (Toronto) and Residency Unlimited (Brooklyn)

Screen Shot 2014-03-20 at 11.37.50 AM

Live translation of 1973 agitprop video at Art Metropole (Toronto) alongside launch of Nathan Isbergs’ Atlantic-Griffin Manifesto, 8 February 2014

Press:
Nobu Adilman of the Toronto Eater puts the Manifesto into context with the video screening in,  The Atlantic’s Nathan Isberg Cooks Up a Manifesto .

Video screening and Q&A with Julia Oldham at RU (Brooklyn), 18 February 2014

This figure of speech has long been used to describe tangled lines of transportation or communications technologies and the people who use them to send goods and information from point to point. Because of the pervasiveness of social media, mobile phones and other technologies that augment our daily lives, we consider communications systems to mimic human behaviour and thought. By this logic, we can only perform as the technology does… read more

Watch the videos

Cette figure de style a longtemps servi à désigner l’enchevêtrement des technologies du transport et des communications, et les usagers qui les utilisent pour envoyer des biens et des informations d’un endroit à l’autre. L’omniprésence des médias sociaux, téléphones cellulaires et autres technologies qui amplifient notre vie quotidienne nous amène à considérer ces systèmes de communication comme des représentations de nos comportements et pensées. Suivant cette logique, notre productivité ne peut que refléter celle de nos technologies… lire la suite

Visioner les vidéos

 

Light On (Flashlight) by Luis Jacob : Network consciousness / La conscience du réseau

Luis Jacob, Light On (Falshlight), 2013, video still. Courtesy of the artist.

Luis Jacob, Light On (Falshlight), 2013, video still. Courtesy of the artist.

Network Consciousness : A Screening of Light On (Flashlight) by Luis Jacob (2013)

Press:
Écart Critique, Nicolas Mavrikakis, Le Devoir, Arts visuels, 9 Novembre 2013
Some ideas are further elaborated in an interview with Nikolas Mavrikakis.

SBC Gallery of Contemporary Art, in association with Vidéographe and Vithèque, presents a one-night event at SBC on Tuesday, November 12th at 5:00 pm to launch Vidéographe’s Network consciousness, a series of multi-venue exhibitions that compliment an online video program. In a time when virtual environments are omnipresent, artist and independent curator Felicity Tayler attempts to link physical and online events.

This one night event presenting a new work by Toronto artist, Luis Jacob, is unique and limited in time and space, but nonetheless will be shared, or networked, over time to a wider audience who is also undergoing a similar experience in other locations and on different platforms. Continue reading

Art’s Stars in Hollywood : Screening and Reading

Art’s Stars in Hollywood : Projection vidéo et lectures

Artexte, Montréal
Wednesday April 18, 2012 at 5 p.m. Walk the red carpet and toast with bubbly in the Quartier des spectacles!
Le mercredi 18 avril 2012 à 17 h. Bulles et tapis rouge seront à l’honneur au Quartier des spectacles!

An evening of readings by contemporary authors around the vintage video Art’s Stars in Hollywood: The DeccaDance (1975). Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Constellations & Correspondences : Networking Between Artists 1970-1980.

Une soirée de lecture d’auteurs contemporains installant un dialogue avec la vidéo Art’s Stars in Hollywood: The DeccaDance (1975). Cet événement est présenté dans le cadre de l’exposition Constellation & Correspondences: transmission entre artistes 1970-1980.

Screening / Projection: Art’s Stars in Hollywood: The DeccaDance, 53 mins
Art’s Stars is a collaborative work involving artists who were active in the correspondence network, including General Idea, Image Bank, Willoughby Sharp and Ant Farm. As a parody of the Academy Awards, over 800 artists gathered to imagine their own constellation of success and celebrity by presenting awards to each other for various categories of absurd achievements.

Art’s Stars est une œuvre collective d’artistes incluant General Idea, Image Bank, Willoughby Sharp et Ant Farm. Crée comme une parodie des Oscars, plus de 800 artistes se sont rassemblés en 1974 pour imaginer leurs propres constellations de succès et célébrité, en se décernant l’un à l’autre des prix pour des réalisations aussi diverses qu’absurdes.

Readings / Lectures: Melissa Bull, Marc-Antoine Phaneuf, Alan Reed and Jacob Wren.

Melissa Bull a déjà publié dans Event, Matrix, Maisonneuve, carte blanche, Lemon Hound et Branch. Son chapbook, Eating Out, a été publié par WithWords, en 2009. Elle est éditrice pour Playboy.com et de la rubrique « Writing from Quebec » pour la revue Maisonneuve.

Marc­-Antoine K. Phaneuf est artiste et auteur. Il a publié deux livres de poésie aux éditions Le Quartanier, Fashionably Tales, une épopée des plus brillants exploits, et Téléthons de la Grande Surface (inventaire catégorique) en 2008. Son prochain livre, Euphorie libidinale dans le meat market, paraîtra en mai.

Alan Reed is an experimental writer turned novelist. He is the author of a collection of poems, For Love of the City (BuschekBooks), and a novel, Isobel & Emile (Coach House Books), and occasionally makes work that sits somewhere between writing, performance and installation art.

Jacob Wren is a writer and maker of eccentric performances. His books include Unrehearsed Beauty, Families Are Formed Through Copulation and Revenge Fantasies of the Politically Dispossessed.

On the Subject of Closure

Synopsis of the day / Synopsis (en Anglais)

  • Tayler, Felicity, « No Closure From Julie Ault », Centre des arts actuels Skol, (20 octobre 2011). PDF
  • Interview between Julie Ault and Anne Bertrand.
  • Video documentation of Julie Ault’s lecture at the Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery.

Master Class with artist Julie Ault (NYC)
Thursday 20 October, 2011 from 10am to 4pm at SKOL

——-
Cours de maître (en anglais) avec l’artiste Julie Ault (NYC)
le jeudi 20 Octobre, 2011 de 10h à 16h à SKOL

Dear colleague,

Due to your long standing contribution to the non-profit artistic milieu, Skol would like to invite you to join us in a day-long master class led by renowned artist Julie Ault, cofounder of Group Material (New York).

Under the spectre of the Conservative majority government, and a generalized feeling that critical practices have been embraced by public and commercial galleries, much energy in artist‐run centres is diverted from programming toward negotiating the contradictory states of survival and growth. Many not-for-profit centres in Montréal have become preoccupied with the state of their archives, or of historicizing their activities, as if in response to the fear of closure or of no future. What happens if we stop doing what we are doing? Continue reading